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Raves: Plasma Rockets

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March 22, 2011

01:34

Note: Adult Language

Our solar system is big. Not just big, but hugely, colossally... gigantic. It's so massive that with the types of rockets we use today, it would take over three years to travel to our nearest neighbour, Mars, and over six to get to Jupiter and its attractive moons. The adage goes, "good things come to those who wait," but tell that to a haggard, atrophied crew suffering from six years of low-gravity cabin fever.

We obviously need a new type of fuel to make our ultimate science fiction dreams come true. The plasma rocket, a type of propulsion designed for the vacuum of space, could be our best bet.

How do they work, and how quickly is the technology advancing? Watch to find out.

Host: Rheanna Sand

Photo credits:
Luc Viatour
http://www.lucnix.be
http://www.adastrarocket.com/
http://www.astrored.org/astrofotos
http://www.plasmaben.com/VASIMR/

References:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17918-rocket-company-tests-worlds-most-powerful-ion-engine.html?full=true
http://science.howstuffworks.com/fusion-propulsion2.htm
http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/a_rocket_for_the_21st_century/

YOUR COMMENTS

marcel on March 10, 2010
where do i sign up...
DreamTheEndless on June 16, 2010
Bah! Orion drive or GTFO.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_drive
Thomas LaGrange on May 20, 2011
Better bring a jacket Marcel, it's cold on Mars.

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