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Raves: Citizen Science

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March 21, 2012

02:10

Sure, being a scientist is hard work. Some of us willingly go to school for 12 extra years in the hopes of getting a "real" science job. But why go through all that pain if you can just log on to a site like Zooniverse or SETI@home to contribute your brain, or your computing power, to the scientific community?

Yes, YOU can be a citizen scientist… So what are you waiting for?

Host: Rheanna Sand

Photo and Video Credits:

NASA, YouTube; Flickr user mscitykitty1; all other images in public domain.

Special thanks to Jennifer Foster for help writing and producing this video.

References:

http://www.zooniverse.org
http://www.greatsunflower.org/
http://whale.fm/
http://fold.it/portal/
http://www.seti.org
http://science.nasa.gov/citizen-scientists/
http://www.scientificamerican.com/citizen-science/

YOUR COMMENTS

Darlene on March 22, 2012
Cool! We love Citizen Science, too! More than 500 active citizen science projects can be found here: http://www.scistarter.com
Edward Wright on March 25, 2012
Another way to get involved is through Citizens in Space, which is combining citizen science with citizen space exploration. Expect our first projects to be announced soon.

www.citizensinspace.org
Jennifer on March 30, 2012
Those are both the great websites. I was watching a Ted Talks, where Regina Dugan illustrated the importance of the game Fold It. What scientists couldn't solve in 15 years, the Fold It community took 15 days to solve. http://www.ted.com/talks/regina_dugan_from_mach_20_glider_to_humming_bird_drone.html

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