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Rumours: Antimatter

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November 18, 2010

02:00

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If you thought your teenager was difficult – being ‘anti’ everything….. anti-family dinners, anti-birthdays and anti-pants. At least you aren’t fostering anti-matter.


Antimatter, theoretically, should comprise of the same amount of space as matter. So, half of all space should be composed of these anti-particles. Except, it isn’t.  New research at the Fermilab particle smasher suggests that matter is better, and that it is produce 1% more frequently than antimatter in particle collisions.  In particular, 1% more muons were produced compared to anti-muons (note: these are not cows).

Still, the overwhelming component of the universe is composed of matter.  It’s probably for the best though, as with all angry teenagers, antimatter tends to annihilate anything in its path.


Host: Torah Kachur


Photo credits: archiecomics.com, INFN-Notizie, Columbia Pictures, NASA


References:
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/topstory/2007/antimatter_binary.html
http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2010/05/mysterious-cloud-of-antimatter-discovered-near-center-of-milky-way-.html
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/01/mystery-of-anti/

YOUR COMMENTS

Reese on June 22, 2010
So does the anti-matter created in these collisions just destroy its matter counterpart right away or is there some way of keeping it around longer. Or does the matter go away to be replaced by anti-matter which is then destroyed by yet another piece of matter?

Also, with the gamma ray emissions, how many do you need to become the Hulk?

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