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Raves: Bomb Detection

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November 16, 2011

01:47

 Airport security is humiliating – now with full body scans and pat downs and having to prove that your penis-shaped lollipop is in fact, just a lollipop.  Thanks Bin Laden.

Bomb detection goes well beyond just airports.   The biggest threat to military service personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan are from improvised explosive devices or IEDs.  Landmines plague dozens of countries around the world and bomb detection mechanisms are hard at work protecting Hummer dealerships throughout California.

Metal detectors, drones, spycams, bees, rats, plants – all have been tried for their bomb detection feasibility. Airport screening detects bombs, drugs, guns and other stuff you need for an optimal Vegas weekend and are all things a dog’s nose can pick out with a quick wag of the tail.  Why not just look down, yes – your trusty Spot, Dusty, Hero or Pookie is waiting diligently at your side to do your bidding.  One dog in an airport security lineup, travelling down the queue faster than you can take out your laptop, dump your Coke, take off your shoes… you get the idea. 


Host: Torah Kachur

References:   http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/05/new-nano-sensor-sniffs-bombs-one-molecule-at-a-time/

http://maic.jmu.edu/journal/7.3/focus/bromenshenk/bromenshenk.htm

 

Photo credits:  Flikr Users:  andy hay, luke.fabish, oscar alexander, eran finkle, kaibara87, eschipul,  afghanistanmatters, hannibal Poenaru, jpctalbot, foxtonque.  Wikipedia Users: Dominic, Maciek, Apophenic.  Wiley science.  Montana Outdoors. DARPA.

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